Queer Places:
Mountain View Cemetery and Mausoleum Altadena, Los Angeles County, California, USA

George James Hopkins | Through the Shattered Lens Presents The OscarsGeorge James Hopkins (March 23, 1896 – February 11, 1985) was an American set designer, playwright and production designer. Hopkins' unpublished 1981 autobiography, Caught in the Act, was used as a major source for Charles Higham's book on the William Desmond Taylor murder.

A native of Pasadena, California, Hopkins got his start designing scenery on stage after studying design in college. He moved to films in 1917, working as an art director for various studios. During his long career, He was an Academy Award winning motion picture set decorator and interior designer. He won the Oscar four times, for "A Streetcar Named Desire" (1951), "My Fair Lady" (1964), "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" (1966), and "Hello Dolly" (1969). Other films on which he worked include "A Star Is Born" (1954), "Auntie Mame" (1958), and "The Music Man" (1962).

Hopkins had a professional and intimate relationship with silent film director William Desmond Taylor, whose unsolved murder was one of early Hollywood's biggest scandals.

On the 1922 morning that Taylor's body was found, Charles Eyton instructed Hopkins to remove a basket of documents from the murder scene, and Hopkins obeyed. Hopkins' unpublished 1981 autobiography, Caught in the Act, was used as a major source for Charles Higham's book on the Taylor murder.[1]


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