Partner William R. Christopher

Queer Places:
Phillips Academy, 180 Main St, Andover, MA 01810, Stati Uniti
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, Stati Uniti
The Art Students League of New York, 215 W 57th St, New York, NY 10019, Stati Uniti
77 State St, Brooklyn, NY 11201, Stati Uniti
249 Beaver Dam Rd, Brookhaven, NY 11719, Stati Uniti
9 W 18th St, New York, NY 10011, Stati Uniti
Hartland, VT, Stati Uniti
St. Francis of Assisi, 28 Union St, Windsor, VT 05089, Stati Uniti
SeaView Cemetery, 233 N Country Rd, Mt Sinai, NY 11766, Stati Uniti

Image result for George TookerGeorge Clair Tooker, Jr. (August 5, 1920 – March 27, 2011) was an American figurative painter. His works are associated with Magic realism, Social realism, Photorealism and Surrealism.[1][2] His subjects are depicted naturally as in a photograph, but the images use flat tones, an ambiguous perspective, and alarming juxtapositions to suggest an imagined or dreamed reality. He did not agree with the association of his work with Magic realism or Surrealism, as he said, "I am after painting reality impressed on the mind so hard that it returns as a dream, but I am not after painting dreams as such, or fantasy." [2] In 1968, he was elected to the National Academy of Design and was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Tooker was one of nine recipients of the National Medal of Arts in 2007.[3]

Tooker acknowledged the need for other art to support his development process. He spent much of his free time reading painting and sculpture books, studying the works of antiquity up to 20th-century art in an effort to augment his artistic vision. He was particularly interested in Classical sculpture, Flemish painting and sculpture, Italian Renaissance painting and sculpture, Dutch Golden Age painting, 17th-century French art, Neue Sachlichkeit art, and Mexican art of the 1920s and 1930s. Some individuals that influenced Tooker include Italian artists Paolo Uccello and Piero della Francesca; American artists Jared French, Edward Hopper, Paul Cadmus, Honoré Desmond Sharrer, and Henry Koerner.[2]

Early in his career, Tooker's work was often compared with painters such as Andrew Wyeth, Edward Hopper, and his close friends Jared French and Paul Cadmus.[5]

In 1960, Tooker and his partner, painter William Christopher (March 4, 1924 – December 5, 1973), moved into a house they had built in Hartland, Vermont. He was involved in the Civil Rights Movement and participated in one of the Selma to Montgomery marches in 1965.[1] He taught at the Art Students League of New York from 1965 to 1968.[3] He spent his winters in Málaga, Spain. A few years after Christopher's death, Tooker converted to Catholicism. His faith was very important to him, as he was very much involved with his local church.

Tooker died at the age of 90 in his home in Hartland, Vermont due to kidney failure.[4]


  1. exhibit-E.com. "George Tooker - Artists - DC Moore Gallery". www.dcmooregallery.com. Retrieved 2016-05-04.
  2. Garver, Thomas H. (1992). George Tooker. New York: Chameleon Books, Inc. ISBN 9781566400695.
  3. "George Tooker - Biography". www.rogallery.com. Retrieved 2016-05-06.
  4. Grimes, William (2011-03-29). "George Tooker, Painter Capturing Modern Anxieties, Dies at 90". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-05-06.