Queer Places:
Casa Frollo, now Villa F, Fondamenta delle Zitelle, Giudecca, 50, 30133 Venezia VE
Cimitero di San Michele Venice, Città Metropolitana di Venezia, Veneto, Italy

Reproduction dun portrait solaris, de Manina by Man Ray on artnetMarianne Tischler, also known by the pseudonym of Manina (Vienna, 11 September 1918 - Venice, 14 January 2010 ), was an Austrian artist. Discouraged by her experience with Alice Rahon, Sonja Sekula became cynical about the possibility of developing a partnership with another woman. Nevertheless, in 1949, she fell in love with Manina Thoeren, whom she met while vacationing in Saint Tropez. Manina Tischler was also friends with Arthur Jeffress.

Marianne Tischler[1] was the daughter of the Austrian expressionist painter Viktor Tischler (1890–1951), of Jewish origin, and the Viennese opera singer Mathilde Ehrlich.[2][3] Viktor Tischler in 1918 was co-founder of the Viennese association of Jewish artists Neue Vereinigung and since 1920 a member of the Hagenbund,[4] group of Austrian artists formed in 1899, which took its name from Herr Haagen, the owner of an inn where painters, sculptors and architects often met to discuss freely.[5] In 1935 Tischler received a prestigious Austrian national award.[3] Marianne's mother sang as a mezzo-soprano and as a light soprano at the Berlin opera and the Wiener Staatsoper, starring among other things in Madama Butterfly.[3] In 1928 the Tischler family moved to Paris, where Marianne frequented artistic circles.[6] Already at the age of 14 she was portrayed by the photographer Erwin Blumenfeld, who composed Manina ou L'âme du torse, [7] and who in 1936 made a series of artistic postcards that reproduced her. From an early age, the artist had chosen for herself the exotic pseudonym "Manina", which she found easier to pronounce than "Marianne".[3] In 1937 Manina married the Czech writer, actor and screenwriter Robert Thoeren (1903-1957). With the emergence of the Nuremberg Laws, the spouses emigrated to Los Angeles in 1938, even before the so-called Anschluss. Thoeren in the United States was successful as a screenwriter. In the United States Marianne met other European emigrants, met Max Ernst and in 1940, the year of the birth of her daughter Nina, she was portrayed in Hollywood by photographer Man Ray.[6][8] After a short training as a sculptor, from 1941 Marianne devoted herself to painting and in 1948 she began to create drawings. The first of these, performed with the gouache technique, was called Daphne. In 1949 she moved to New York after separating from Thoeren. Thanks to the intercession of the poet and literary critic Eugene Jolas, in 1951 Manina set up the first solo exhibition of drawings at the Hugo gallery. The exhibition was among others reviewed in the New York Tribune by Emily Genauer, who in 1974 obtained the Pulitzer Prize for best critical journalism. Later Marianne stayed in London for two years, and in 1954 she moved to Venice, a city that exercised a magical force of attraction on her.[9] In Venice, Manina also met the French poet Alain Jouffroy, whom she married shortly after, and who dedicated a series of poems to her. In particular, in the collection Eau sous terre (Gallimard, Paris, 2005) each poem by Jouffroy is inspired by a drawing of his wife.[8] Through Jouffroy he came into contact with the French surrealists. From that moment on, Marianne's painting conveyed a magical-dreamlike atmosphere, characteristic of the artistic current of surrealism. André Breton himself indicated her as a "born surrealist",[9][8] and on the occasion of the Manina exhibition in 1952 at the Cocteau gallery, Breton referred to her work as "pure poetry of the surreal".[8] After the death of her daughter Nina, killed on the Los Angeles Campus in 1960, Manina retired to her home on the Giudecca Island, where she also spent the last years of her life.[8] She lived, amongst other places, in Casa Frollo on Giudecca.

May be an image of 1 person
by Erwin Blumenfeld

May be an image of 1 person
by Erwin Blumenfeld

May be an image of 1 person
by Erwin Blumenfeld


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