Queer Places:
University High School, 11800 Texas Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90025, Stati Uniti
Neptune Society Columbarium, 1 Loraine Ct, San Francisco, CA 94118, Stati Uniti

Roderick Andrew Anthony Jude "Roddy" McDowall (September 17, 1928 – October 3, 1998) was an English-American actor, voice artist, film director and photographer. He is best known for portraying Cornelius and Caesar in the original Planet of the Apes film series, as well as Galen in the spin-off television series. He began his acting career as a child in England, and then in the United States, in How Green Was My Valley (1941), My Friend Flicka (1943) and Lassie Come Home (1943).

As an adult, McDowall appeared most frequently as a character actor on radio, stage, film, and television. For portraying Augustus in the historical drama Cleopatra (1963), he was nominated for a Golden Globe Award. Other titles include The Longest Day (1962), The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965), That Darn Cat! (1965), Inside Daisy Clover (1965), Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971), The Poseidon Adventure (1972), Funny Lady (1975), The Black Hole (1979), Class of 1984 (1982), Fright Night (1985), Overboard (1987), Fright Night Part 2 (1988) and A Bug's Life (1998). He also served in various positions on the Board of Governors for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Selection Committee for the Kennedy Center Honors, further contributing to various charities related to the film industry and film preservation. He was a founding Member of the National Film Preservation Board in 1989, and represented the Screen Actors Guild on this Board until his death.

Although McDowall made no public statements about his sexual orientation during his lifetime, several authors have claimed that he was discreetly gay.[20][21]

In the spring and summer of 1965, while working on Inside Daisy Clover, McDowall made many 8mm movies on-set and in Malibu, of the cast and friends, which were later given to soap box productions, who transferred to video, and uploaded to YouTube.[22][23]

In 1974, the FBI raided McDowall's home and seized his collection of films and television series in the course of an investigation into film piracy and copyright infringement. His collection consisted of 160 16-mm prints and more than 1,000 video cassettes, at a time before the era of commercial videotapes, when there was no legal aftermarket for films. McDowall had purchased Errol Flynn's home cinema films and transferred them all to tape for longer-lasting archival storage. No charges were filed.[24]

On 3 October 1998, at age 70, McDowall died of lung cancer at his home in Studio City.[25] His body was cremated and his ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean on 7 October 1998 off Los Angeles County.[26] Dennis Osborne, a screenwriter, had cared for the actor in his final months. The media quoted Osborne as having said, "It was very peaceful. It was just as he wanted it. It was exactly the way he planned."[27]


  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/queerplaces/images/Roddy_McDowall