Queer Places:
1 Lauriston Rd, Wimbledon, London SW19 4TJ, Regno Unito
Manor Inn, 2 Stoke Gabriel Rd, Galmpton, Brixham TQ5 0NL, UK
Collice St, Islip, Kidlington OX5 2TB, UK
Dingle Cottage, Ridgeway, Boars Hill, Oxford OX1 5EY, UK
Charterhouse School, Charterhouse Rd, Godalming GU7 2DX, Regno Unito
University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, Regno Unito
Deià, 07179 Deià, Majorca, Spain

Robert Graves (24 July 1895 – 7 December 1985), also known as Robert von Ranke Graves,[1] was an English poet, historical novelist, critic, and classicist. His father was Alfred Perceval Graves, a celebrated Irish poet and figure in the Gaelic revival; they were both Celticists and students of Irish mythology. Graves produced more than 140 works. Graves's poems—together with his translations and innovative analysis and interpretations of the Greek myths; his memoir of his early life, including his role in World War I, Good-Bye to All That; and his speculative study of poetic inspiration, The White Goddess—have never been out of print.[2]

He earned his living from writing, particularly popular historical novels such as I, Claudius, King Jesus, The Golden Fleece and Count Belisarius. He also was a prominent translator of Classical Latin and Ancient Greek texts; his versions of The Twelve Caesars and The Golden Ass remain popular, for their clarity and entertaining style. Graves was awarded the 1934 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for both I, Claudius and Claudius the God.[3]

During the early 1970s Graves began to suffer from increasingly severe memory loss. By his 80th birthday in 1975, he had come to the end of his working life. He lived for another decade, in an increasingly dependent condition, until he died from heart failure on 7 December 1985 at the age of 90 years. His body was buried the next morning in the small churchyard on a hill at Deià, at the site of a shrine that had once been sacred to the White Goddess of Pelion.[7] His second wife, Beryl Graves, died on 27 October 2003 and her body was interred in the same grave.[46]


  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/queerplaces/images/Robert_Graves