Husband Alfred Augustin

Queer Places:
Château de Lully, 1132 Lully, Svizzera

Hugues-Adhémar Cuénod (26 June 1902 – 6 December 2010)[1][2][3][4] was a Swiss classical tenor and music educator known for his performances in international opera, operetta, both traditional and musical theatre, and on the concert stage, where he was particularly known for his clear, light, romantic and expressive poised interpretation of mélodie (French art song).[5] A master of diction and technique, his repertoire encompassed everything from the medieval chansons of Guillaume de Machaut, Elizabethan Love Songs, the sacred renaissance compositions of Claudio Monteverdi to the operas of Jacques Offenbach and the avant garde works of Igor Stravinsky, as well as recordings of lute songs. Cuénod contributed to the revival of baroque music, performing compositions by Francesco Cavalli and others. A distinguished singer of Johann Sebastian Bach's music, he was particularly praised for his interpretation of the Evangelist in Bach's St Matthew Passion.[5] He had the longest career of any recorded vocalist or performer in history: he gave his first performance in Paris in 1928, appearing in musical comedies, later in his career gravitating more towards concert and opera, he gave his last concert in 1992; of the latter performances he became best known in the role as Emperor Altoum, appearing opposite Plácido Domingo in Puccini's Turandot.

Cuénod's native language was French, but he was fluent in English, German and Italian. He resided with his life partner, Alfred Augustin (41 years his junior), in the Vaud region of Switzerland. They lived in the Château de Lully, an 18th-century castle that belonged to his grandfather, who purchased the property in 1899. In June 2007, when Cuénod was 105, he and Augustin entered into a civil union after changes in Swiss law gave same-sex couples many of the legal benefits of marriage.[11]

Cuenod became a centenarian in 2002, and died aged 108, on 6 December 2010 at his home in Vevey, Switzerland[2][3][4]


  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/queerplaces/images/Hugues_Cu%C3%A9nod