Partner Franz Nopcsa von Felső-Szilvás

Queer Places:
Nopcsa Castle, DJ686, Săcel, Romania

Image result for Bajazid DodaBajazid Elmaz Doda (1888–1933) was an Albanian ethnographic writer and photographer. Close companion of Hungarian baron and scholar Franz Nopcsa, he is author of the book Albanisches Bauerleben im oberen Rekatal bei Dibra (Makedonien) (Albanian Peasant Life in the Upper Reka Valley near Dibra (Macedonia)), written in Vienna in 1914, as well as of numerous rare early-20th-century photos of Albanian-inhabited lands during the period when they belonged to the Ottoman Empire, especially of Upper Reka, his birthplace region.

Bajazid Doda was born in 1888 in Štirovica, an Albanian-inhabited village of the Upper Reka region of Macedonia in what was then the Ottoman Empire. He went to Romania to work abroad, like many other Upper Reka inhabitants.[1] In Bucharest, Romania, in 1906 he met the Hungarian baron and scholar Franz Nopcsa (1877–1933), who hired him as his servant.[1] The two became close companions and began to live together.[1]

Nopsca and Doda left Bucharest for the Nopcsa family mansion in Săcel, Transylvania, and thereafter spent some several months in London where Doda fell ill with influenza.[1] In mid-November 1907 the two traveled to Shkodër, where they maintained a house from 1907 to 1910 and again from October 1913.[1] They travelled around Mirditë and were kidnapped by a famous bandit Mustafa Lita.[1] After their release in Prizren, they travelled to Skopje and went to visit the home of Doda in Upper Reka.[1] Back in Shkodër, they went and visited the lands of tribes Hoti and Gruda.[1] Both traveled together and separately throughout the Albanian lands.[1] During the First World War in 1915-1916, Nopcsa took Doda with him while serving in the Austro-Hungarian army in Kosovo.[1] After the war, they lived mainly in Vienna where Nopcsa published several books and became known not only as an albanologist, but also as a paleontologist and geologist.[1] On April 25, 1933, suffering from depression Nopcsa killed Doda in his sleep and then committed suicide.[1]


  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/queerplaces/images/Bajazid_Doda#References