Days of Love by Elisa Rolle

Days of Love Gallery

(©1) (This work is in the public domain. This applies to [Works Registered or First Published in the U.S.] Date of Publication [Before 1923] Conditions [None] Copyright Term [None. In the public domain due to copyright expiration]. This applies also to [Works First Published Outside the U.S. by Foreign Nationals or U.S. Citizens Living Abroad])
(©2) (This work is in the public domain. This applies to [Works Registered or First Published in the U.S.] Date of Publication [1923 through 1977] Conditions [Published without a copyright notice] Copyright Term [None. In the public domain due to failure to comply with required formalities]. This applies also to [Works First Published Outside the U.S. by Foreign Nationals or U.S. Citizens Living Abroad] Conditions [Published without compliance with US formalities, and in the public domain in its source country as of 1 January 1996])
(©3) (Carl Van Vechten Collection at Library of Congress. Donor restrictions expired in 1986 (see below for amplification). However, privacy and publicity rights may apply. Access: Permitted; subject to P&P policy on serving originals. Reproduction (photocopying, hand-held camera copying, photoduplication and other forms
of copying allowed by "fair use"): Permitted; subject to P&P policy on copying. This policy prohibits photocopying of the original photographs in this collection. Publication and other forms of distribution: Per the instrument of gift, "for a period of 20 years from the date of this Instrument [1966], none of the photographs contained in said collection may be sold, reproduced, published or given away in any form whatsoever except with my [Saul Mauriber, Photographic Executor for Van Vechten] express permission in writing." This restriction expired in 1986. In 1998 the Library’s Publishing Office was contacted by Bruce Kellner, who disputes Mr. Mauriber’s authority in executing the Instrument of Gift. Upon review of the relevant materials, the Library continues to believe that the photographs are in the public domain. However, patrons are advised that Mr. Kellner has expressed his concern that use of Van Vechten’s photographs "preserve the integrity" of his work, i.e, that photographs not be colorized or cropped, and that proper credit is given to the photographer. Privacy and publicity rights may apply. Credit Line: Library
of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Carl Van Vechten Collection, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-USZ62-54231])
(©4) (This work is in the public domain. This applies to [Never Published, Never Registered Works] Copyright Term [Life of the author + 70 years]. What was in the public domain in the U.S. as of 1 January 2015 [Works from authors who died before 1945]. "Publication" was not explicitly defined in the Copyright Law before 1976, but the 1909 Act indirectly indicated that publication was when copies of the first authorized edition were placed on sale, sold, or publicly distributed by the proprietor
of the copyright or under his authority.)
(©5) (Courtesy of Jonathan G. Silin (jsilin@optonline.net). Source Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers by Robert Giard)
(©6) (Courtesy of photographer Stathis Orphanos (sylvanos@aol.com), www.orphanos.com)
(©7) (Louis K. Meisel is the owner of all intellectual property rights to the body of art created by Charles Bell. Mr. Bell’s wish was to have his work reproduced and distributed as widely as possible for as long as possible.To that end, Louis K. Meisel will license any and all of these images for any respectable and respectful use.)
(©8) (This work has been released into the public domain by its author at the wikipedia project. This applies worldwide. The author grants anyone the right to use this work for any purpose, without any conditions, unless such conditions are required by law. Redistribution, derivative work, commercial use, and all other use is permitted.)
(©9) (There is no George Quaintance’s estate per se. George Quaintance left his estate to Victor Garcia and a second business partner (Tom) in a will that was probated, but neither of those men left a will or trust behind. Tom had no known living relatives when he died. Victor had a niece and nephew, but they chose not to take the legal steps that would have been required to secure the Quaintance estate in their name. Quaintance has a living relative in Virginia who exercises copyright control over a large number of family records, photos, memorabilia, etc. that she owns.)
(©10) (Copyright retained by donor, and by Carl Navarro following donor's death. No restrictions on photocopies. Israel David Fishman papers, The New York Public Library, Archives & Manuscripts)
(©11) (Arnold Genthe Collection at the Library of Congress. The photographs Arnold Genthe made for his own use are considered to be in the public domain. Other photographs, however, may have been produced as "work for hire" and copyright may be held by the original client. Privacy and publicity rights may also apply. Access: Permitted; subject to P&P policy on serving originals. Reproduction (photocopying, hand-held camera copying, photoduplication and other forms of copying allowed by "fair use"): Permitted; subject to P&P policy on copying. Publication and other forms of distribution: May be restricted. To assist researchers, the Prints & Photographs Division made every effort to include in the catalog record client/sitter names that could be deciphered from the photographer's sleeves and logbook. If such names are not included in the catalog records, there is no further information. Privacy and publicity rights may also apply. Credit Line: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Arnold Genthe Collection: Negatives and Transparencies, [reproduction number, e.g., LC-G786-3452])
(©12) (The rights holder for work by Pavel Tchelitchew (1898-1957) remains unknown.)
(©13) (This work is in the public domain. This applies to [Works Registered or First Published in the U.S.] Date of Publication [Anytime] Conditions [Works prepared by an officer or employee of the United States Government as part of that person's official duties] Copyright Term [None. In the public domain in the United States (17 U.S.C. § 105)])
(©14) (This artistic work created by the United Kingdom Government is in the public domain. This is because it is one of the following: It is a photograph created by the United Kingdom Government and taken prior to 1 June 1957; or It was commercially published prior to 1963; or It is an artistic work other than a photograph or engraving (e.g. a painting) which was created by the United Kingdom Government prior to 1963. HMSO has declared that the expiry of Crown Copyrights applies worldwide))
(©15) (Courtesy Image)
(©16) (“Editorial usage”. This image is of a cover(s), and the copyright for it is most likely owned either by the artist who created the cover(s) or the publisher/studio of the book(s)/movie(s). It is believed that the use of low-resolution images of covers to illustrate an article discussing the book/movie in question qualifies as fair use under United States copyright law. Use of the image in no way violates the copyright holder's legal rights.)
(©17) (Usage rights: The images are licensed under Creative Commons and/or GNU Free Documentation Licenses.) To view a copy of these licenses:
- GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2, November 2002, Copyright (C) 2000,2001,2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.51 Franklin St, Fifth Floor, Boston, MA 02110-1301 USAEveryone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copiesof this license document, but changing it is not allowed: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:GNU_Free_Documentation_License_1.2
- CC Creative Commons License Attribution-NoDerivs 2.0, the work (as defined below) is provided under the terms of this creative commons public license ("ccpl" or "license"). the work is protected by copyright and/or other applicable law. any use of the work other than as authorized under this license or copyright law is prohibited. by exercising any rights to the work provided here, you accept and agree to be bound by the terms of this license. the licensor grants you the rights contained here in consideration of your acceptance of such terms and conditions: http://creativecommons.org/
(©18) (The George Grantham Bain Collection represents the photographic files of one of America's earliest news picture agencies. The collection richly documents sports events, theater, celebrities, crime, strikes, disasters, political activities including the woman suffrage campaign, conventions and public celebrations. The photographs Bain produced and gathered for distribution through his news service were worldwide in their coverage, but there was a special emphasis on life in New York City. The bulk
of the collection dates from the 1900s to the mid-1920s, but scattered images can be found as early as the 1860s and as late as the 1930s. Available online are 39,744 glass negatives and a selection of about 1,600 photographic prints for which copy negatives exist. This represents all of the glass plate negatives the Library holds and a small proportion of the 50,000 photographic prints in the collection. The Library purchased the collection in 1948 from D.J. Culver. (Bain also deposited photographs for copyright during his career; photographs clearly acquired by the Library of Congress through copyright deposit are generally considered outside the scope of the George Grantham Bain Collection.))
(©19) (UK artistic work, of which the author is unknown and cannot be ascertained by reasonable enquiry, is in the public domain because it is one of the following: A photograph, which has never previously been made available to the public (e.g. by publication or display at an exhibition) and which was taken before 1st January 1944; or A photograph, which was made available to the public (e.g. by publication or display at an exhibition) before 1 January 1944; or An artistic work other than a photograph (e.g. a painting), which was made available to the public (e.g. by publication or display at an exhibition) before 1 January 1944.)
(©20) (This image is of Australian origin and is now in the public domain because its term of copyright has expired. According to the Australian Copyright Council (ACC), ACC Information Sheet G023v16 (Duration of copyright) (Feb 2012): a) Photographs or other works published anonymously, under a pseudonym or the creator is unknown: taken or published prior to 1 January 1955; b) Photographs (except A): taken prior to 1 January 1955; c) Artistic works (except A & B): the creator died before 1 January 1955; d) Published editions (except A & B): first published more than 25 years ago; e) Commonwealth or State government owned photographs and engravings: taken or published more than 50 years ago and prior to 1 May 1969)
(©21) (This photographic image was published before December 31st 1956, or photographed before 1946, under jurisdiction of the Government of Japan. Thus this photographic image is considered to be public domain according to article 23 of old copyright law of Japan (English translation) and article 2 of supplemental provision
of copyright law of Japan.)
(©22) (This Canadian work is in the public domain in Canada because its copyright has expired due to one of the following: 1. it was subject to Crown copyright and was first published more than 50 years ago, or it was not subject to Crown copyright, and 2. it is a photograph that was created prior to January 1, 1949, or 3. the creator died more than 50 years ago.)
(©23) (This file is in the public domain, because this is a German photograph over 50 years old. Under Germany's copyright law, Article 72, this means that any copyright has expired.)
(©24) (This image is in the public domain because the Danish Consolidated Act on Copyright of 2010 specifies (§91, 5) that all photographic images not considered to be "photographic works" that were created before 1 January 1970 are exempt from protection. Note that "photographic works", which must display artistic merit or originality, enter the public domain 70 years after the death of the photographer and that photographs that are not considered works but created 1 January 1970 or later become public domain 50 years after they were created.)
(©25) (This photograph is in the public domain, because either 50 years has elapsed from the year of creation or the photograph was first published before 1966. The §49a of the Finnish copyright law of 2005 specifies that photographs not considered to be "works of art" become public domain 50 years after they were created. The 50 years from creation protection period came into force in 1991. Before that the protection period was 25 years from the year of first publication according to the §16 of the law of protection of photographs of 1961. Material already released to public domain according to the 1961 law remains in public domain, and therefore all photographs (but not photographic works of art) released before 1966 are in the public domain.)
(©26) (Most periodicals published in the US prior to 1964 had to renew their issue copyrights after 28 years in order to retain copyright on the issue: Life (Time Inc.): issues renewed from Nov. 23, 1936 (v. 1 no. 1); Time: issues renewed from January 29, 1934 (v. 23 no. 5); see 1962 Jan-Jun)
(©27) (In France for phonographic works, the proprietary rights last for 50 years after the date of recording. In addition, posthumous works are copyrighted 25 years from the year of publication.)
(©28) (In Russia the 1993 copyright law reaffirmed the prolonged copyright term
of generally 50 years from the 1991 Fundamentals, applicable to all kinds of works. Works of known authors were copyrighted until 50 years after the author's death (50 years p.m.a.). Anonymous or pseudonymous works were copyrighted until fifty years after the first disclosure, unless the identity of the author became known during that time and the term of 50 years p.m.a. thus applied)
(©29) (In Swiss Copyright protection for most protected works expires 70 years after the death of the author, the only exception being computer programs, which are protected for 50 years after the death of the author. As a result of the non-retroactive revision of 1992, when the 50-year copyright term was extended to 70 years, works that were already in the public domain in 1993, when the new law started being applied, do not benefit from renewed protection; therefore, all works made by authors deceased in 1942 or before are in the public domain in Switzerland).

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